Card fraud

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rick
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Re: Card fraud

Post by rick » Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:03 pm

Only, of course, the UK address of Paypal is '//paypal.com/uk/'. The extra dots are interesting i.e '.kggf.pw/' - there must be quite a few registered paypal lookalike sites out there to have to resort to those extra dots and characters. It look a bit like a compressed address when presented like that too.
The '/secures-paypal' one is smarter - I presume it is false. Just never follow links like that!

One of the things I like about Japan is that it is strongly a cash friendly place. You can walk into a little shop to buy a can of iced tea with the equivalent of a £50 note and the shopkeeper isn't phased at all. Yen in paper and coins are a cherished tradition but that goes hand in hand with a culture where (almost) no-one ever gets mugged (though there are just a few places where you might get fleeced if you're not careful.) I think it has something to do with living in a natural disaster hotspot - even the Yakuza (the underworld) mobilise rescue forces in a crisis!
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Marigold
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Re: Card fraud

Post by Marigold » Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:07 pm

Oh dear. So what did you do?
Margaid
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Re: Card fraud

Post by Margaid » Mon Dec 03, 2018 11:01 pm

In circumstances like that, you don't click on the link and delete the email immediately. Then contact the supposed sender (if you have an account with them) using your normal method and tell them about it. My bank has requested that one forwards all "phishing" emails to them. I have a BT internet email address, although they are not my broadband supplier. I regularly get emails telling me I need to change my password or take some other action or my account will be blocked. My email program lets me hover the mouse over the link and displays the actual web address at the bottom of the screen. But BT always address me by name and quote the last four digits of my account ...
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Tweetypie
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Re: Card fraud

Post by Tweetypie » Mon Dec 03, 2018 11:47 pm

I blocked the number and deleted the message, obviously I did not click the link... I logged into Paypal to check if anything looked suspicious, but it didn't. I don't tend to get phishing emails due to an ad blocker etc, but this was via a text message, must be random, as I change my every 2 years when I upgrade and I don't use it for shopping websites. Seems they find a way to get you, if you are not careful enough to check...
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rick
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Re: Card fraud

Post by rick » Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:47 am

Its not anything to do with a lack of being careful. They will have just tried your number randomly Tweetypie, and guessed that you had that account. It could have been any common account,
Its an information gathering exercise. Just clicking the link provides useful info - the number is active and the account exists, and most importantly it is someone who might be susceptible to further work. Just like those ads and fliers that say 'You've won the prize already! Just contact this number to confirm your details!'
The kind of system they will be using probably only has very a tiny success rate but it churns out texts like that all day long.
That's why its called 'phishing'. Throw some bait out and see what happens!
... They're worst crime is stealing trust
... So just echoing what you all said really - its just one of those subjects that makes me want to say something. Mostly how they are not so clever just equipped and persistent, a bit like my mice :)
bigyetiman
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Re: Card fraud

Post by bigyetiman » Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:10 pm

Thats similar to the sort of emails OH got Tweetypie, they went on daily in a slightly different format each time. As she didn't have a Paypal account she wasn't going to fall for it. Just clicked on the phishing scam link as she deleted them and after a while it stopped. A friend had something similar purporting to be from Amazon.
Texts we get seem to be of the "you haven't claimed for the car accident" type damn annoying
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Marigold
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Re: Card fraud

Post by Marigold » Fri Dec 07, 2018 10:32 pm

We have a BT CallGuardian landline phone which can be set to require any unknown caller to go through a recognition process before we accept the call. People we want to keep in touch with go into our online directory and when they ring, their names come up on the handset and they get straight through. This works brilliantly at completely stopping those irritating recorded sales calls from abroad, and most of the ones from this country as cold callers don't want the bother of going through the vetting process when it's clear that the person on the other end isn't a fan of theirs. However, a few cold calls from the UK do sometimes get through. A couple of weeks ago, I got a call from some unknown solar company, offering to check the system we had installed 7 years ago. I never respond to cold callers and I put the phone down on them. A few minutes later they rang again, this time managing to say they had recently bought the firm who installed our system and asking if we would like them to check it over. I said no thanks, a bit more firmly. Blow me down, they then rang again, and this time I was a bit rude and told them to leave us alone and I would block their number if they tried again.

A day or so ago, they again cold-called us with the same story, and this time it was my husband who answered. He's the sort who is too polite to tell Jehovah's Witnesses to bugger off, and keeps the front door open to them in the depths of winter listening patiently to their doom and destruction. Consequently, he informed me that a rep would be visiting this afternoon to inspect the inverter on our system. When the rep turned up, he didn’t have any details of our installation or the name of our original installer. He said that, as our inverter was now seven years old, it was out of guarantee and it would be wise to replace it before it malfunctioned and whilst the £500 boiler scrappage scheme was still running. He didn’t know when or if the scrappage scheme was due to end. When asked what could go wrong with an inverter, he said that the electric cables could be chewed by mice, causing a short circuit. He took a look at our inverter, but didn’t inspect it or check the cabling, he just recorded the reading of units generated. He agreed that our system was working well, in fact better than might have been expected, judging by the units generated.

He then explained that his company could supply and instal two kinds of inverters, either a Grow Watt with a 10-year warranty for £2,100, or a Solar Edge with a 25-year warranty for £3,500. He said he was not allowed to write these prices down for us, claiming that prices were changing all the time, dependent of whether a cluster of customers could be fitted in one day to save transport costs etc, and he didn’t provide any sales materials with details of the specification of the appliances, so I wrote the prices down on a piece of paper myself for future reference. When discussing guarantees, he recommended that, if we ever needed to make a claim under guarantee, we should go back to the manufacturer rather than to the company who supplied the appliance.

He said that, if we agreed to choose a new inverter then and there, to save him the costs of a future visit, it would be fitted next Thursday or Friday, and after that, the price might well go up. When we said that we would not make such a decision without thinking about it first, he said that we could have until Monday to book our appointment for the end of next week. Since under Consumer Contracts Regulations, customers have a 14-day cooling off period for purchases made by salesmen or over the telephone, such a speedy appointment to fit an appliance would not allow time for that to happen. He suggested that we should immediately fill out the order form and said that he was prepared to waive the deposit of 10% to secure our booking.

Of course we found these high-pressure sales tactics most off-putting, and in no circumstances would we have bought anything from a company that employed them. Our concerns were increased when going on line to check up on Chelsfield Solar, the very reputable company which installed our system and which they said had gone out of business, and from whom they claimed to have bought the previous customer list. We were pleased and relieved to find that they are still going strong, and still saying they don't need to employ any sales people or pressured techniques because most of their business comes from recommendations from happy customers, like us.

Under the circumstances, you will not be surprised to hear that we have no intention of booking a replacement inverter installation from this firm. And I hope my husband has learned his lesson.....
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LadyA
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Re: Card fraud

Post by LadyA » Sat Dec 08, 2018 10:25 am

Golly, Marigold, the cheek! Have you told your original company that this crowd are telling their customers that they've been taken over, and are no longer in business? Can't this new firm be reported to someone like Trading Standards? It sounds like downright fraud.
Lead me not into temptation. I can find the way myself!
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Marigold
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Re: Card fraud

Post by Marigold » Sat Dec 08, 2018 11:59 am

I've written to the firm, outlining my complaint about their methods, and am awaiting their reply. When I get this, or after a week if nothing happens, I shall complain to Trading Standards (there's an online form to do this) and also update our own original installer about what has happened. I expect this sort of scam is pretty common actually, preys upon the insecurities of the sort of people who buy expensive insurance for new electrical goods when these have a 2-year guarantee in any case.
When we were sitting round the table, listening to his sales talk, my husband was very quiet and left it all to me. Later, he said he had enjoyed watching me take the sales rep apart, without being in any way offensive to him - 'like having a miscreant boy up in front of the headmistress' was how he put it. Glad to find I haven't lost my touch!
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Marigold
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Re: Card fraud

Post by Marigold » Sat Dec 08, 2018 3:51 pm

Researching the Clear Renewable website, http://www.clearrenewable.org I see they claim to be members of 'The Fair Trades Association', complete with what purports to be an impressive badge of the sort that is normally a link to another site. Unfortunately, the link doesn't work, - possibly because no such association exists, although Google directed me to The Fairtrade Foundation, a reputable international organisation.
I've also found out that replacing an inverter with a 10-year guarantee is a simple job, taking no more than an hour, and costing around £500 for one like ours, rather than the £2,100 we were quoted for their 'basic model.'
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