Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

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Chickenbrain2009
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Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by Chickenbrain2009 »

Hi, I am a bit confused about this :-)19 ,
I have a current run of myoplasma in my flock. So far I have seperated them out but culled both. I now have the third bird with the same thing. They are going on antibiotics, but if a bird has had myoplasma and has been treated with anitbiotics can you breed from him or her?

I am coming to the conclusion that this is endemic in the wild bird population and cullling may not be the answer

Thanks

Pam
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chrismahon
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Re: Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by chrismahon »

Myco is all a bit vague. We culled the one we had with it because she had chronic cankers as well. She developed Myco after the treatment for the cankers had been going for about 3 weeks. The others in the same coop are fine. It appears when their immune system is run down. Three of them in that group are our Buff Orpington breeding stock and will remain so.

I remember reading that quickly injected Tylan is the best treatment, followed by another a few days later. We tried oral and it was just too slow and Myco had taken hold. Yes it comes from everywhere and if your birds are fit and healthy they seem to be unaffected. It seems to me to be something that develops because of something else -poor diet, stress, worms perhaps or another illness. Isabella was, and remains, the only bird affected here. So I think you are right Chickenbrain, culling is not the ultimate answer, but when they have it and it takes hold it is the only option.
Chickenbrain2009
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Re: Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by Chickenbrain2009 »

I am convinced it the weather!
Chickenbrain2009
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Re: Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by Chickenbrain2009 »

So what I am not sure is, do I only cull birds that develop symptoms? and if they have developed symptoms and been treated can I ever breed from them?
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Marigold
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Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by Marigold »

Would this depend on whether it can be transmitted in the egg, assuming the eggs were incubated rather than under the parent hen?
I don't know the answer, would be interested if anyone could tell us.
Chickenbrain2009
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Re: Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by Chickenbrain2009 »

Apparently it is transmitted in the egg
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foxy
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Re: Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by foxy »

When a bird has become infected at some stage with mycoplasma, they will carry the disease for life, although will not necessarily display symptoms. The degree of infection will vary depending on the strain the flock is infected with, and the overall health of flock. Regarding strains of mycoplasma, some are more virulent than others therefore the impact of the disease in a flock will vary.

At different stages mycoplasma is more "pathogenic" this simply means it is more able to spread either vertically.. through the egg or horizontally chicken - chicken. The process of infection is done by the bacteria "shedding" meaning the bird now is more infectious, than when they are not showing any symptoms of illness. So when a bird is under stress, the immune system becomes less able to deal with the dormant disease and the mycoplasma becomes "activated" thus the bird become ill with symptoms, and at this stage the disease is more pathogenic as higher levels of shedding occur.

So, what does this mean for breeding? You can reduce the risk of shedding and thus potential infection through measures to ensure the best health, support the immune system and thus reduce flare-ups (activation) I have heard a course of antibiotics as a prophylactic can help.The best time to breed (if you have too...) is during a dormant phase, less shedding = less transmission to the egg. You then at 6 weeks might want to further protect the offspring by vaccination. At this point, I would cull any young birds with symptoms to eradicate mycoplasma from your flock. It is also important if you choose this route to be careful when buying in birds, or hatching eggs for that matter, as this will potentially undo any of the work you have done to protect your poultry.
Chickenbrain2009
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Re: Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by Chickenbrain2009 »

Thats an excellent reply, thank you so much. I am afraid my Lavender aracauna is next for the chop in that case. Shes been seperated but is worse today.

Pam
Chickenbrain2009
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Re: Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by Chickenbrain2009 »

Should I cull the cockeral that shares the same pen as he will now be a carrier?
Will all the birds in that pen be carriers? I have four left, including one of my favourites.
I normally sell hatching eggs and day olds bred from the next door pen at the moment.
What are the implications for the birds in the next door pen? Can I breed from them?
Are the eggs safe to eat? I assume so or it would be noitfiable
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chrismahon
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Re: Can you breed from birds treated for myoplasma?

Post by chrismahon »

If you think forwards Chickenbrain, ultimately all surviving chickens will be resistant but carriers. The resistant chickens are the future strong stock. I have no intention of culling any of ours that may have been exposed to it but needed no treatment, because if they have been and have survived surely they are the best stock to breed from! Only the same situation as ILT, IB and Mareks. You could argue that if they were treated and recovered they are now much stronger as well.
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