Poorly chuck

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chrismahon
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by chrismahon » Sun Aug 05, 2018 8:23 am

Chickens get hay fever surprisingly- results in a lot of sneezing. We've had several this year with pollen from the trees and treated them with a single 1mL shot of cod liver oil. This gives the immune system a boost and definitely works for us.

A runny nose can be a residue of mycoplasma. I read half chickens carry it but few are affected- we have one that occasionally throws up symptoms but, as she is very healthy (apart from a dislocated hip), it never develops into anything other than a blocked nose on one side. We know that she has it because her sister died with chronic symptoms shortly after arriving at their new home- the stress of the move depressed her immune system and the illness overwhelmed her.

Chickens are very susceptible to dust which irritates their airways causing sneezing and a runny nose. We had two Orpingtons that arrived with dust around their noses and their symptoms didn't subside for a month. Occasionally they flared up again which we soon traced to dusty feed.

Avipro Avian has two doses. A scoop to 100mL is the emergency dose we we administer with a syringe to an individual at at least 10mL per day for several days. Takes about a week or so for the effects to be noticed. There is a maintenance dose of 200mL to a scoop which we have never applied so I don't know the frequency.
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Tweetypie
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by Tweetypie » Sun Aug 05, 2018 9:24 am

Thanks, Chris. I think I will syringe 1ml of cod liver oil into a tiny cherry tomato, as she adores them and swallows them whole :-) She's OK so far this morning, no sneezing, so maybe something did irritate her, or hayfever, as you suggested. She does forage a lot more than the other 3 and is more adventurous. I bet she's been sticking her beak into stuff she shouldn't. :-)10
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rick
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by rick » Sun Aug 05, 2018 9:52 am

Chris has said it re Avipro pro biotic - but just to mention,
the 200mL water to a scoop is meant as an occasional top up/boost but for a 2L drinker that would be a large portion of a whole pot and it isn't cheap! The recommended dose in food is 10 times smaller - I guess its on the food and that is more effective, also better related in quantity to the food eaten.
My favorite pro biotic boost (well for the hens) is to put three heaped desert spoons of scratch grain into a jar, add 3 times the depth of spring water, add about a level teaspoon of Avipro and leave to ferment for a couple of days. Then mix that into a mash with pellets. The pot lasts ages and they love it!

... it should smell like malty sourdough, slightly vinegary, just a little yeasty. If it smells of acetone, alcohol or any other bad whiff then discard it but I have never had it go wrong. The Avipro adds to the good lacto-bactiria/yeasts already on the grain and so it gets off to a good start.

Or you could just mix the maintenance dose with food as it says on the container, of course! :)
Last edited by rick on Sun Aug 05, 2018 10:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Marigold
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by Marigold » Sun Aug 05, 2018 10:05 am

Go easy on the cod liver oil - overdoses of Vit D are toxic to hens (as well as to people) and will make the eggs taste fishy. Try a single dose if you want to, but then maybe leave it on the shelf until the depths of winter, when they may benefit from a few drops sprinkled on their feed as a supplement.
I agree with Rick about adding Avipro (or any supplement) to feed rather than to water, as in water half of it will be thrown away when you change the drinker.
Or just don't bother with any supplements if your hens are apparently healthy and not moulting. Hens fed a sensible diet, like yours, are most unlikely to have any dietary deficiencies. The possible exception is Nettex Mineral Powder, which may help older hens who are beginning to experience poor shell quality. This has probiotics as well as minerals, and is also helpful when they're moulting. .
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Tweetypie
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by Tweetypie » Sun Aug 05, 2018 8:57 pm

They all seem healthy and agile, but i tjink i will get some avipro just in case I need it another time. They have acv in their water and smallholder crumble as mentioned by a few on here. I also put a sprinkle of that spice stuff in their feed now and again. Two cherry tomatoes each per day as a treat and the occasional slice of watermelon to share, which they scoff like they've never been fed for a week 😁.
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hip chick
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by hip chick » Mon Aug 06, 2018 11:04 am

Tweetypie, im currently looking for new plants for around the outside of the pen, and came across this. Just thinking of you giving them tomatoes daily

Plants that are part of the nightshade family - Members of the nightshade family include potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplant. The Latin name for these plants is Solanaceae. This is because they contain a compound called solanine. This is toxic to chickens. The compound can be broken down if the plants are cooked however. So any cooked potatoes or tomatoes are generally ok to give to your chickens. If you are worried, it is better to just not feed these plants to your chickens.
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Tweetypie
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by Tweetypie » Mon Aug 06, 2018 1:39 pm

Oooh gosh I didn't know that about tomatoes. I knew raw potato was. I just googled it and the stems and leaves are indeed poisonous, but not the actual tomato. Can anyone else confirm, as u don't want to take the risk?
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hip chick
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by hip chick » Mon Aug 06, 2018 2:29 pm

I think your right tweetiepie. The fruit itself should be fine. It appears the stems and leaves are toxic though
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Marigold
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by Marigold » Mon Aug 06, 2018 2:54 pm

I've always given mine any left-over ripe tomatoes with no problems. The red colour really excites them, chickens are particularly sensitive to red, - which is why drinkers for chicks are usually red as it encourages them to drink. I wouldn't give them unripe ones, though.
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hip chick
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by hip chick » Mon Aug 06, 2018 5:22 pm

just realised I have buttercups, jasmine and ivy, all of which are poisonous. Looks like I,ve got a busy week of removing plants while they are contained to their pen :-)07
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