Poorly chuck

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Please remember the advice offered by people should not constitute a diagnosis and does not replace the advice of a qualified vet.
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chrismahon
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by chrismahon » Fri Aug 03, 2018 10:30 am

That foamy poo is typical of a bird with possibly hair worms- so tiny they are almost invisible to the naked eye. But they alone shouldn't pose a big problem. The temperatures are not helping at the moment I know, but there could be more than one thing going on here and usually is in my experience. Smelly poo is indicative of a gut flora imbalance which can be readily caused by natural sugars in fruit. I recommend Avipro Avian, something we always use in any water we syringe in. You will need to administer it anyway 3 days after the antibiotic course finishes as antibiotics destroy the natural gut flora.
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hip chick
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by hip chick » Fri Aug 03, 2018 6:45 pm

Hi thank you for that. I haven't given the antibiotics as I wanted to see how she was today. She seemed to pick up on eating and drinking, but ive noticed her stretching her neck a lot and kinda yawning. When ive googled it saying possibly gape worm. I wonder if I should just start them all on the flubenvet today, as im at a loss. Also she has had a fruit treat daily so thank you for the advice on that. Her poos are not foamy or runny today, and appear back to normal
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rick
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by rick » Fri Aug 03, 2018 11:56 pm

Vets never really tell you what their hunch is (fair enough, an absolute diagnosis would cost the earth most times!) I think Tylan may be targeted at mycoplasma (?), air sac infection (?) Its possible - but the normal poos are a great sign. Seems to me that everything in a chicken is interconnected and a working gut is always a good sign! Hopefully the good care she has had has helped her to beat it herself.
Worming will do no harm (and might be a very good idea) but she would need to be back on plain pellets with the rest, or you dose her special special food separately. I think gaping can have several causes due to discomfort in the trachea, esophagus or crop. Maybe she ate something nasty. A gentle massage of the crop can help move things along.
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Marigold
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by Marigold » Sat Aug 04, 2018 7:05 am

I'm really glad to hear she's making progress. If you haven't yet used the Tylan, and want to get the full dose of flubenvet inside her, you could try the individual dosing method.
Mix up a supply of irresistible treats, sunflower seeds, mixed corn, muesli, bird seed etc. Find a small container, a size that she will eat the contents in one go. Measure out 7 small containers full into another box and add a little vegetable oil, to lightly coat the grains, then mix in half a scoopful of flubenvet powder and mix throughly. Give her one measured container-full each day for a week. Half a scoop full is the dose for one hen, maybe a little less for a small bird such as your Silkie, but a bit more won't hurt her. This will get the full dose into her, even though her appetite may be down at present. Look at her poos the first day or so, you may see worms coming out if this is the problem.
At least Flubenvet is a harmless routine treatment, which will sort out the worm question, as she seems to be making good progress in other areas. Lots of people on here, like Chris above, recommend Avipro Avian, and you could give her this alongside the flubenvet to help with the gut upset.
You could multiply up the amount of treated mix and do your other birds at the same time, if you wanted. I always worm mine that way, it saves them having to endure a whole week with nothing to eat but treated pellets. The recommended method of dosing with treated pellets is obviously directed at people with many chickens kept in a confined area, but it can be done in other ways.
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chrismahon
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by chrismahon » Sat Aug 04, 2018 7:29 am

Stretching here neck and yawning can be gapeworm, but that's unlikely. More likely is some solid lump in her crop which she is moving about to break up or dry food stuck in her throat. Make sure she is drinking plenty of water, especially when it is hot weather.
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hip chick
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by hip chick » Sat Aug 04, 2018 8:47 am

Thank you all I'm finding the site a great support. I have her in her own coop and run within the larger pen so she's not separated off from the others. I'm using the flubenvet pellets so they will all be confined to the pen until treated. She's had normal poos again this morning and was in her nest box laying while I was cleaning out her run, so hopefully we are on the up. Thank you all for the advice and I will keep you updated as the week goes on
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chrismahon
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by chrismahon » Sat Aug 04, 2018 9:31 am

Just a point about Avipro Avian. It is important that this probiotic isn't used at the same time as antibiotics because it drastically reduces the effectiveness of the course- something we realised too late a few years back. Wait three days after the antibiotics are completed before starting on AA.

Normal poos are a great sign. Two very early indicators of impending illness are:-

1- Not talking. Whilst some chickens are naturally quiet the majority will talk to you when you talk to them. If they stop something is wrong.

2- Abnormal poos. Check the coop daily. Now this is a tricky one because they can produce abnormal poos for a variety of reasons. Probably the most alarming are watery white ones which are the result of a moulting chicken eating their own feathers. They usually get fed up with that after a few days. Not pooing at all, so 5 hens in the coop but only 4 piles of poo, should prompt an immediate crop check. Green poo is diet or illness. Dark poo is diet or internal bleeding, which we've had on a few occasions without problems- the worst for that is an 8 year old outside sunbathing as I type. We had a poo recently which was a huge mix of undigested all sorts- she had eaten a lizard (saw her swallow it whole) and was very ill as a result. Grain in the poo is insufficient grit. Needless to say I've spent far too much time examining chicken poo and now we have a dog!
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Marigold
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by Marigold » Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:07 am

That's all very good news, especially about the pooing normally and laying! Maybe just some kind of gut upset - any lizards down your way?
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Tweetypie
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by Tweetypie » Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:41 pm

It's so good to read all the comments, especially for someone like me, who is inexperienced with chickens. I tend to worry at the slightest change I see in them.

I noticed Barbie ex batt was sneezing a couple of days ago, I wiped it with tissue. She didn't have it yesterday, but today has a bit of a clogged nose and the occasional sneeze, as if she has some irritant in there. She's laying every day as normal, normal poos (as far as my experience will tell), tail up, no signs of anything else and up to her usual tricks - ruining the flowers in the borders. All others are OK. Do you think I am being over cautious?
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hip chick
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Re: Poorly chuck

Post by hip chick » Sat Aug 04, 2018 1:43 pm

Chrismahon I spend my whole life studying poo, as I work as a careworker on nights, and also have 3 dogs lol. Marigold, definitely no lizards where we are either. I did find a very large hairy catepillar half dead in the pen last week, which one had obviously brought in, but not sure if that could have anything to do with things. Ive decided not to give the antibiotics as last year my husband contracted an infection, which wouldnt initially respond, and took 5 weeks of treatment and daily hospital visits, so that was a very good point, thank you. My chucks do spend a lot of time in the soil under our large maple tree, but now they have their own dusbath in the pen, we will gravel that area in the next week, just incase they have picked something up in that area. Hetty being poorly has meant lots of cuddles and TLC, and me spending hrs in the pen, but she's also much happier being handled. I will also try the Avopro Avian to support the gut.
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