WORMING

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Re: WORMING

Postby rick » Sun Mar 05, 2017 11:34 am

I didn’t think they would turn their beaks up to Verm-X on bread! Have put it in their water. Its pretty pungent stuff but not unpleasant - a bit like garlicky Worcester sauce.
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Re: WORMING

Postby chrismahon » Sun Mar 05, 2017 1:09 pm

Doubt the lack of vets or a totally alien product range would have put us off coming here though Dinosaw. Our new house is brilliant- a wonderful place for retirement, although the chicken enclosure will be somewhat of a challenge to manage as there are no trees for sun shelter. Trees are OK, but the falling leaves, fruit and risk of branches are a constant problem so we will need sunshades.

May have misled you Rick. Ours won't eat Verm-X on bread either so it's a case of carefully prying the beak open, making sure no sideways force is applied to the lower, dipping a 1cm square of bread into a measure of Verm-X and popping it down their throat, repeating until it has all gone which usually takes 5 or 6 cubes. They swallow it easily and usually stop struggling after the first one or two.
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Re: WORMING

Postby rick » Sun Mar 05, 2017 3:22 pm

Ack! Thanks Chris. I had assumed mine were just being spoilt and fussy although, to be fair, I had read of others feeding it on bread and them liking it.
I wonder if they developed the pellets for that reason. Presumably you wouldn’t have to do the same thing with horses and buns! :)
Anyway, they are drinking the water. Though they wont get as definite a 'dose' it will have to do. Maybe its my imagination but they do seem to be full of beans today!
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Re: WORMING

Postby Marigold » Sun Mar 05, 2017 9:58 pm

RE horses and buns - gave me fond memories of trying to worm my large and very lively pony, holding on to his head collar with one hand and trying to get a large syringe of horse wormer between his clenched teeth and hold it there for long enough to squirt in the toffee-like stuff, despite his head tossing and his feet wheeling around. When I was eventually successful, he would calm down and settle to licking the toffee off his teeth and lips and tongue, with a thoughtful and appreciative expression on his face, it's much easier with chickens, however you choose to do it!
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Re: WORMING

Postby EWROBERTS41 » Wed Mar 08, 2017 12:17 pm

Hi everybody, Enjoyed reading everybody's views on worming especially Marigolds mash. I give mine warm porridge as a treat once a month which they dive into as soon as I put the plate down. I wondered if I was to add flubenvet to it and give to the for the 7 days whether this would work. I know they all eat the porridge so they all get a share. On another subject, what is the latest on the Avian flu. Somebody near me said that the restrictions had been lifted, but I've not seen or heard anything about this.
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Re: WORMING

Postby rick » Wed Mar 08, 2017 2:08 pm

Hi ER,
I think the idea of a proportion of what they like (i.e. porrage) being combined with layers mash is a good one - If its to be any substantial part of their diet. I doubt one meal a day of just porridge (plus the wormer) would do any harm though.
The flu restrictions are based on this map now: http://www.gisdiseasemap.defra.gov.uk/i ... an/map.jsp
and the guidance is: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/avian-influ ... ntion-zone (where you will also see a link to the map.)
Basically, if you are in one of the pink/brown areas then the risk is deemed to be 'Higher' and they need to stay under solid cover.
If not then it is pretty much common sense - they can come out but any risk of mixing with wild birds (especially water birds) must be avoided.
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Re: WORMING

Postby EWROBERTS41 » Sun Mar 12, 2017 11:38 am

Hi Rick
Had a look on the map as you suggested. I am in Kent and it looks from the colour (blue grey ?) that I am in a high risk area, although I have not heard of any infection here, my girls will be kept in a secure run which has a roof netting which is the best I can do. They all look healthy enough to me. I haven't seen any water fowl passing overhead unless of course that they travel at night which a lot of them do.
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Re: WORMING

Postby rick » Sun Mar 12, 2017 12:36 pm

Yes, I checked the guidance again and its 'indoors or netted' so your OK apart from if their an obvious rain of poops from the sky! (i.e more than the occasional one from the odd pigeon, blackbird etc.)
If you are near open water/water birds then watch out for walking it in on your boots. Some separate shoes for the back garden and run would be a good precaution. There's a patch on a path where I walk the dog in the morning where there is always a quagmire where they regularly come out of the water to roost in the night.
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Re: WORMING

Postby rick » Sat Mar 18, 2017 12:47 pm

From 600 - 750 eggs/g to 300 - 1500 eggs/g in 2 weeks (that was 0 - 750 first time if I count in Linden who had none)
Its not looking very promising for the Verm-X - certainly not a worm wipe out like Flubenvet (we already knew that) but still safe so will see if it balances out or keeps rising. It is occurring to me that this very common and low impact worm (Ascaridia galli) may be excluding other more damaging species (like Capilaria that I have only seen before with very low numbers of others)(?)
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