Drought conditions

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Margaid
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by Margaid » Sat Jul 07, 2018 10:55 pm

If I ever try building a house again, or went mad and did a major restoration, I'd have a proper "grey water" system installed and an integrated rainwater harvesting system with underground tank and dual pipe work so it can be used for flushing loos. Chris probably knows better than I do how they work.

I have my own old oil tank, which I'm still using. Round here you'd only get one if someone was having a new tank fitted, in which case the old one probably leaks. Scrubbing it out would be a no-no as that would contaminate the ground.
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chrismahon
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by chrismahon » Sun Jul 08, 2018 7:58 am

Grey water recycling is fine in theory, but in practice the pipes will clog up very quickly so you would need a complex filtration system which would also clog up- maintenance costs therefore outweigh the savings. Rainwater storage is fine and we had a local community centre with it fitted, the tanks being under the building itself.

We have the capability here of collecting far more water and perhaps when some of the more important jobs have been done we'll look at it. We've found the solution to mosquitoes and it's not a film of oil or fish. We have 'water boatmen' in the one tank without mosquitoes- apparently a few of the varieties eat the larvae, so we'll transfer a few to the other tanks. Hopefully they will breed.
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Marigold
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by Marigold » Sun Jul 08, 2018 11:59 am

Daughter returning today from Porthmadoc area, where she's a team leader for groups from her school who are on the Gold D.of E. test. This has involved a 3-day expedition in teams of 4-5, route finding over mountainous country carrying a really heavy pack of food and everything they need to camp and survive, except water, which is available at check points. She says they've been getting up at 5 a.m. to get going before it gets to 30C. and everyone is exhausted. Part of the route had to be changed because of fire risk in the drought. She's full of admiration for the way they've all tackled it and got through the gruelling conditions. Locals say they've never experienced anything like this before. Water levels are very low - the stream which ran though the garden of the cottage at Beddgelert we rented two years ago is nearly dry, whereas when we were there it was in spate and the roads were flooded so we couldn't get to see the osprey site nearby.
Daughter is off to Crete next week with her family 'to recover' - looks as if the weather will be much the same there as at home.
https://www.holiday-weather.com/crete/forecast/
bigyetiman
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by bigyetiman » Mon Jul 09, 2018 11:45 am

This year we could have all walked along the river bed to the Ospreys. Good on your daughters group for getting through it.
After watching the RAF 100 flypast tomorrow we are off to sunny Sunderland for Tall Ships event, and the weather looks goods for the week, a tad cooler than home thankfully
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LadyA
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by LadyA » Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:45 am

:( Oh, please, please, let it rain!! :(
Lead me not into temptation. I can find the way myself!
MrsBiscuit
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by MrsBiscuit » Fri Jul 13, 2018 10:53 am

I was back in the UK last week and it is definitely hotter and drier than here in Portugal. My mother has a brown lawn, whereas we have green grass and weeds. It is still unseasonably cool here, with positively cold nights, heavy mists (like autumn) in the morning and plenty of moisture on the ground overnight. It really is a topsy-turvy year for the weather. We don't have a borehole or a well, but there are underground springs and we live next to a communal fonte (spring water) so we get some water from that for the garden, but really I have learnt to establish plants in autumn and early Spring when rain is plentiful and only use the water for veg and a bed of cut flowers. However, I have cut down both of these as well as in a proper summer we use so much that even those huge plastic water cubes don't last very long (I watched my neighbour empty his in the space of a week!) The citrus and fruit trees all need infrequent, but deep, dowsings, for which I use a hose and metered water. The only trees I don't have to do are the olives, even the grapes need a bit of water. Despite the severe summers, hosepipe bans are rare. I am also much more conscious of forest planting where you plant in layers, with the taller plants providing shade and allegedly a harmonious microsystem. I had been planting like this unconsciously, but now I begin to observe things more thoroughly, I can see it does work, here at least where the sun is so fierce.

My family also went to Ireland this week (Wexford) and said how beautiful it was!
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Marigold
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by Marigold » Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:30 pm

We had a day with friends in Chippenham today and we all enjoyed a heavy shower at lunchtime and the wonderful smell of rain on parched ground. Only 2mm in the rain gauge but all the snails were out on the path when we left at 8.30. We drove home along roads flooded in places, with masses of gravel etc washed down from the edges. When we got to Andover the rain on the roads became patchy, and then dried up altogether. Deeply disappointed to find that Whitchurch hadn't had a drop - as usual, it had skated round us.
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rick
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by rick » Sat Jul 14, 2018 12:08 am

Ive just been to water the public tulip tree planting at the end of our street. Its been in the ground for 2 years but got off to a bad start establishing itself in the planting pit and died back so to lose its leader. Bounced back this spring and then got hit by drought conditions. 10 liters just hit the ground and disappeared but hopefully Ill remember to do it again tomorrow. There are a lot of new plantings in Leam and Brum that are getting stressed this year - hopefully the maintenance plans will replace the ones that don't make it but proactive watering is well off the available budget (water or cash.)
But there are a lot of new plantings around and most are not on the way out, just a tad early to yellow.
It was low cloud that almost feels like rain in Brum earlier and the same in Leam later. We need a summer torrent!
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Hen-Gen
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by Hen-Gen » Sat Jul 14, 2018 6:41 am

We have 0.2mm forecast for 4pm. That’s mm, not cm. I don’t know how I’m going to cope with such a torrential downpour. :D
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chrismahon
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Re: Drought conditions

Post by chrismahon » Sat Jul 14, 2018 6:58 am

Yesterday morning the heavy rain band missed us by just 15kms but we had some rain last night which wasn't forecast so caught us by surprise. It's supposed to be 34C here this afternoon so the stuff we left out that got wet should dry. Monday is supposed to be heavy rain but thunderstorms are possible- we can get 25mm in an hour. So at the moment the water storage is 1500 litres and we're OK. The trees look a bit droopy but hopefully they will get the water they need. Our tulip tree needs a torrent as well Rick as it's in an exposed position at the top of a bank, which wasn't a particularly good place for the previous owners to plant it.

Plans for mowing grass have been shelved, but now it's wet enough to get the scythe out again and collect some hay.
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