red mite

The place to discuss worms, mites, lice, rodents, wild birds, foxes, badgers, dogs etc.
User avatar
rick
Part of the Flock
Posts: 1241
Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2014 12:52 pm
Location: Warwickshire UK

Re: red mite

Post by rick » Fri Nov 03, 2017 7:30 pm

You are kind of committed now to using it all for it's intended use, or storing it forever, or disposing of it legally and safely. The trouble with substances like this insecticide (apart from being an industrial forge hammer to crack a nut that you had probably cracked already) is that if you need to dispose of them it means making an appointment with the local authority at a disposal site, filling in the paperwork and paying the fee. I fear that too often it ends up in landfill or worse. Whatever you do don't tip it down the drain - it would have the same effect as throwing several dozen hand grenades into your local river so far as the fish would be concerned!
If you use it carefully as advised it should be OK. You wont have any mites, or flies, or any insects for that matter!
... but then, as pointed out above, the poultry farmer that said that they only use the professional 'hard core' stuff would only expose one flock of birds to it once. That would be to blitz the barn before the new layers or growers came in and then they wouldn't do it again until that flock went wholesale to slaughter. The suppliers were not anticipating someone using it repeatedly on the same flock because, basically, that would be unheard of nonsense.
Some 'backyard' keepers do replace their flock in a similar way to the industry, either with the hard cut off or when the numbers/laying is dwindling and there's nothing wrong in that, depending on your interest. If so keep the insecticide to treat the coop a few weeks before the new flock come in.
Just to put things in perspective - a 'chicken farmer typically has a barn of a thousand or tens of thousands of hens in a flock. An outbreak of red mite early in the cycle would be pretty devastating to their investment and they can't micro-manage the situation like we can.
It would be interesting to hear Poultryman's views on the subject as he does keep over a thousand birds in South Africa where red mite are surely even more of a problem than in the UK.
... I love my birds so much! (looking for a suitably dewy eyed emoticon!) and have made mistakes along the way that I regret (though not beating myself up about it too much.) One mistake has not been aware enough of the red mite population but I know their tricks and habits now and I, for one, will be very surprised if they get the better f me again. In keeping pet chickens I will be inadvertently be keeping some 'pet' red mite and nematodes! Just not very many if I have anything to do with it!
Another mistake has been underestimating the sensitivity of a bird's respiratory system (sorry Teabag and Betty.) That one I defiantly won't be repeating. There are not many fatal ailments in a bird that don't start, in one way or another, with the air sacks including respiratory, heart and reproductive problems (the intestine or just plain old age are about the only exceptions.)
dye29
Regular Forum Contributor / Laying Well
Posts: 165
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 2:43 pm

Re: red mite

Post by dye29 » Sun Nov 05, 2017 7:44 pm

so far so good no signs of red mites ive 2 rubber mats hung against shed nothing there also my red mite tester from durham hens havnt anything so thumbs up for now , out of all hens 2 still look bit red but feathers are starting to regrow , would i be right in putting some poultry tar on there bootys
User avatar
rick
Part of the Flock
Posts: 1241
Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2014 12:52 pm
Location: Warwickshire UK

Re: red mite

Post by rick » Mon Nov 06, 2017 9:10 am

That's good news dye. Had never heard of Stockholm tar before. Sounds like it might be useful stuff but not on pin feathers. Pins are very fragile and you don't want to mess with them or even handle the chickens more than necessary until they have grown out sufficiently.
Broken pins can lead to a wound/pecking cycle that will be a nightmare to break.
In a couple of weeks they will have fluffy pants again in time for the winter :)
dye29
Regular Forum Contributor / Laying Well
Posts: 165
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 2:43 pm

Re: red mite

Post by dye29 » Mon Nov 06, 2017 8:30 pm

ill leave well alone for now then , ive just setup several dust baths up what do you guys use to mix with earth powder just beach sand obviously dry clean stuff
User avatar
Marigold
Moderator
Posts: 5546
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 6:27 pm
Location: Hampshire, U.K.

Re: red mite

Post by Marigold » Mon Nov 06, 2017 9:40 pm

I use play sand from Homebase.
dye29
Regular Forum Contributor / Laying Well
Posts: 165
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2017 2:43 pm

Re: red mite

Post by dye29 » Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:40 pm

perfect got a homebase near me thanks
User avatar
Marigold
Moderator
Posts: 5546
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 6:27 pm
Location: Hampshire, U.K.

Re: red mite

Post by Marigold » Wed Nov 08, 2017 7:51 pm

I was interested in the redmite tester from Durham Hens that Dye reported using, as it had apparently worked to show the presence of redmite, so I looked it up. The website wasn't very clear about what you actually got, but it was only a fiver including postage so I thought I would get one. It turned out to be two cable clips and a 5" length of 18mm wooden dowel, slipped into a 4" sleeve of plastic tubing, with the ends of the dowel sticking out of the tube. You use the cable clips to fasten the device under a perch and check it for mites once a week by sliding the dowel out of the sleeve. It reminded me of the ingenious little devices Rick invents, you could definitely make a profit marketing your ideas if you had time, Rick. You could probably make one that lit up and rang a bell when a red mite landed on it....
I shall certainly install it and check it regularly, to make sure that my claim never to have had redmite is still holding up. However, it's not radically different from what I've been doing for some years in my plastic Green Frog coop, i.e. sliding out the perches from the slots they sit in and looking for mites. So far there have been none, but it will be good to have a belt to my braces, I suppose.
Margaid
Regular Forum Contributor / Laying Well
Posts: 948
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2012 6:27 pm
Location: Shropshire

Re: red mite

Post by Margaid » Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:38 pm

I seem to remember reading somewhere that if you fasten an ordinary drinking straw to the underside of the perch, if you have redmite they'll hide in it.
Never tried it myself as I was able to creosote my wooden houses - the secondhand one had been infested, and my other house was a Solway plastic house, secondhand, which I completely dismantled and scrubbed out when I got it, but then doidn't get much use.
User avatar
rick
Part of the Flock
Posts: 1241
Joined: Sun Aug 31, 2014 12:52 pm
Location: Warwickshire UK

Re: red mite

Post by rick » Wed Nov 08, 2017 11:53 pm

Humbly - Thank you for the vote of confidence Marigold!
Sliding the perch out of its slots to check (if the coop is made that way) is defiantly the most direct way of checking the same thing as the tube device.
Inventions are one thing but the practical need for them within reason is another - could make a unit that had a mite attractive gap which, at 12 noon every day, used an ultrasonic driver to kill and discharge everything in the gap into a bag for inspection leaving the gap clean and mite friendly for the next night but I reckon the unit would retail at about £500 unless every keeper in the world wanted one which seems unlikely!
Other than keeping chickens I would like to add another string to the bow with woodblock printing (cant work in an office forever and the prospect of that is getting less appealing all the time) Diary of the kid who had to take apart the radio :)
... rather than listening to the rock 'n' roll which is, by far, the better thing to do.
User avatar
Marigold
Moderator
Posts: 5546
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 6:27 pm
Location: Hampshire, U.K.

Re: red mite

Post by Marigold » Thu Nov 09, 2017 8:33 am

Margaid wrote:I seem to remember reading somewhere that if you fasten an ordinary drinking straw to the underside of the perch, if you have redmite they'll hide in it.
.
How would you know, if they were deep inside the straw?
Make a cup of tea and suck them up?
Post Reply

Return to “Pests & Predators”