Condensation in coops.

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karminski
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by karminski » Mon Nov 28, 2011 7:14 pm

yikkssssssssssssssssss thats scary , i have to call my horse feed peeps tomorrow as they have 2 dutch bantams pols i can buy { actully being brought for me for xmas } and i am sure i have seen the odd bag there i'll ask if they can order in a few bags for me .
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dinosaw
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by dinosaw » Mon Nov 28, 2011 7:51 pm

Ha ha, that would be my reaction too, I'm lucky enough to live close enough to pick it up myself so £9.38 a bale for me, just out of interest what is everyone else paying for theirs? I know omlet are charging their customers a whopping £13 which is naked profiteering in my view
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chrismahon
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by chrismahon » Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:09 pm

I'm paying about the same dinosaw. More to buy as I need to minimise this condensation thing before the ply goes mouldy again. Will add it is no good for young birds at all- like under 6 weeks. It is very sharp and their feet get cut to pieces.
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dinosaw
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by dinosaw » Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:21 pm

Thats good to know Chris as I am planning to do some rearing next year
DanHibbert
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by DanHibbert » Wed Nov 30, 2011 3:21 pm

I am currently in the process of putting togther concepts for a ventilation system that will react to the weather and will maintain the temperature and humidity levels at an acceptable level.

The following system could easily be described as being excessive for use in a chicken coop however I am enclined to include such a mechanism so my project will meet all aspects of the project criteria for and Engineering Degree Project.

I am hoping to create a system that will adjust the area of open ventialtion using either a mechanical solution such as those used in green houses scaled an adapted for use in a coop (example:
http://www.greenhousepeople.co.uk/acces ... r_xl_d472/ )
or use an automated version of the standard sliding ventilation window board used on most coops to change the area of the ventilation opnening.

Another thought would be to include a ventilation fan which could be operated when the temperture and humidity reach the top end of their respected acceptible ranges or when it is not suitible for the ventilation to be left fully open but there is a need for heat to be expelled. Of course an automated system would need the inclusion of electronics, batteries and the possiblity of a small solar cell (something my supervisor seems to be keen on...)

Again, possibly over excesive for the design of a small scale chicken coop. :lol:

Thinking about the topic of condensation, maitaining a certian level of air flow trough the coop would minimise the condensation level.The only problem with this is of course is loosing to much heat with a constant flow of air. The heat would need to be reclaimed form the air before it left the coop otherwise the chooks are going to get pretty cold.
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chrismahon
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by chrismahon » Wed Nov 30, 2011 4:13 pm

So you need a ventillation heat exchanger Dan -they cost more than the coops!
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Marigold
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by Marigold » Wed Nov 30, 2011 5:02 pm

DanHibbert wrote:Thinking about the topic of condensation, maitaining a certain level of air flow through the coop would minimise the condensation level.The only problem with this is of course is loosing to much heat with a constant flow of air. The heat would need to be reclaimed form the air before it left the coop otherwise the chooks are going to get pretty cold.
Cold isn't the problem, Dan, chickens are very well able to cope with cold, and nobody is suggesting coops require heating in any form. Wrapped up in their beautiful feather duvets in winter, they're like polar explorers in a tent! It's more important to have a system that allows sufficient ventilation to avoid the overheated 'doctor's waiting room' conditions that prevail if the humid air can't escape. Under those conditions, infectious bacteria can be passed on between birds close together and breathing each other's expelled air. Also, as Chris has highlighted, condensation in wooden coops can lead to mould growth on the wood and damp bedding, which in turn can promote bronchial problems from inhaling mould spores. Adjustable ventilation would probably be more use in hot summer conditions than in winter actually. When it's cold I get the impression it's difficult to get people to open up enough vents to allow full ventilation, because they think the birds will get cold.

Also of course there's the aspect of security from predators in a coop with large vents or if the pophole is usually left open, whatever the design, (though the obvious solution to this lies in run security. If the birds aren't safe in the coop at night because the run isn't secure, they are also going to be at risk during the day - foxes etc are not entirely nocturnal.)

I think that whatever you come up with, solar power just has to be part of it - so many of us haven't got mains electric in our runs but are turning to solar for lighting and even for electric fencing.
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chrismahon
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by chrismahon » Wed Nov 30, 2011 6:33 pm

A great summation of the subject Marigold. Good point about the runs in the daytime but foxes are still far more likely at night, even in suburbia, certainly at this time of year. At night there is no-one around to disturb them either. But yes, to really get a grip on the condensation issue the pop-hole should be left open on coops that suffer and the attached run should be fox proof, not just fox resistant. Alternatively, if possible, modify the coop to get an increase in size of the air vents.
karminski
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by karminski » Wed Nov 30, 2011 7:06 pm

reading all this is making me paranoid about my new coop :lol: so far i still havent had any condensation at all and the only fresh airflew there is from the roofing as its onduline :-)05 wander why i aint getting any , am thinking now that maybe i should take the doors of and add vents to that with wire mesh covering them it will be easier to do it that way then to try and cut holes into the main sides .
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Marigold
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Re: Condensation in coops.

Post by Marigold » Wed Nov 30, 2011 7:29 pm

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Karminski! I should think onduline roofing is excellent for ventilation, with that row of vents under the wiggles in the onduline. If you're nor getting any condensation, there's no problem, is there?
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